Propagated Hydrangea

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judyk05
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Propagated Hydrangea

Post by judyk05 » Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:38 pm

I successfully propagated a hydrangea over the past year. It has grown to about 18" tall with lush leaves and bud! It is now November and I have it indoors. Should I put it outside in the pot it is still growing in or plant it in the ground now or should I wait til next spring? If I keep it indoors will it survive til next spring? It is a beautiful plant that I propagated from a friend's home in SC. please advise.... I am in south central PA, zone 6.
Many thanks, Judy K
jmkopp40@gmail.com

lorijones
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Re: Propagated Hydrangea

Post by lorijones » Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:54 am

If this hydrangea came from South Carolina, it may not be hardy in your zone. Do you know kind of hydrangea it is? It is possible that it might survive the winters but if it is one of the varieties that blooms on old wood it might not be "bloom hardy" in your area because the flower buds would freeze during the winter. If this happens you will not get flowers.
I would keep it in its pot this winter. Place the pot up against the house where it is protected and cover it with some loose leaves - oak leaves are best. If you want, you could keep the pot in your basement or garage and water it sparingly.
In the spring, plant it in the ground in a protected location. It may do fine - time will tell. You may find that you will have to protect it over the winter. A good way to accomplish this is to surround the shrub with black roofing paper and carefully pack straw or oak leaves inside around the branches and stems. Use stakes to hold the cylinder of roofing paper in place. If the shrub is very wide, you can carefully draw the branches together with twine before making your enclosure of roofing paper. The black roofing paper is ideal because it not only provides a wind screen, but it also absorbs heat from the sun and keeps the shrub warmer in the winter. You can use burlap in the same way but it doesn't absorb heat the way the roofing paper does.

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